802.589.0911 Live Chat With Us

Finish Selecting Your Vehicle to Shop For Your Axle Shaft

Choose a Year for your Toyota 's Axle Shaft

  • 2009
  • 2008
  • 2007
  • 2006
  • 2005
  • 2004
  • 2003
  • 2002
  • 2001
  • 2000
  • 1999
  • 1998
  • 1997
  • 1996
  • 1995
  • 1989
  • 1988
  • 1987
  • 1986

Shop By Brand

The Following brands are available based on your search.

  • Dorman
    Dorman
  • Genuine
    Genuine

Best Selling Genuine Toyota Axle Shafts

  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including Dorman, Genuine
  • Constantly Updated Inventory of Toyota Replacement Axle Shaft Parts

We stock Axle Shaft parts for most Toyota models, including 4Runner, FJ Cruiser, Pickup, T100, Tacoma, Tundra.


Dorman
2001 Toyota Tundra Axle Shaft - Rear Left Dorman

P311-0FCCED7    630-340  New

4231134040

Qty:
283.07
Dorman Axle Shaft  Rear Left
  • Product Attributes:
    • ABS Tone Ring Installed: Not Included
    • Axle Type: Solid Shaft Axle
    • Hole Quantity: 6
    • Package Contents: Axle Shaft, Wheel Studs, Wheel Nuts, Bearing And Seal
    • Spline Quantity: 30
    • Wheel Lug Quantity: 6
Brand: Dorman
Position: Rear Left
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle BrakeABS Position
2001 - Toyota Tundra 4-Wheel ABS Rear Left
Dorman
2005 Toyota Tundra Axle Shaft - Rear Right Dorman

P311-0FCCED7    630-340  New

4231134040

Qty:
283.07
Dorman Axle Shaft  Rear Right
  • Product Attributes:
    • ABS Tone Ring Installed: Not Included
    • Axle Type: Solid Shaft Axle
    • Hole Quantity: 6
    • Package Contents: Axle Shaft, Wheel Studs, Wheel Nuts, Bearing And Seal
    • Spline Quantity: 30
    • Wheel Lug Quantity: 6
Brand: Dorman
Position: Rear Right
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Body Position
2005 - Toyota Tundra Standard Cab Pickup Rear Right
Dorman
2004 Toyota Tundra Axle Shaft - Rear Left Dorman

P311-0FCCED7    630-340  New

4231134040

Qty:
283.07
Dorman Axle Shaft  Rear Left
  • ; Excludes Double Cab
  • Product Attributes:
    • ABS Tone Ring Installed: Not Included
    • Axle Type: Solid Shaft Axle
    • Hole Quantity: 6
    • Package Contents: Axle Shaft, Wheel Studs, Wheel Nuts, Bearing And Seal
    • Spline Quantity: 30
    • Wheel Lug Quantity: 6
Brand: Dorman
Position: Rear Left
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Body Position
2004 - Toyota Tundra Extended Cab Pickup Rear Left
Dorman
2006 Toyota Tundra Axle Shaft - Rear Right Dorman

P311-0FCCED7    630-340  New

4231134040

Qty:
283.07
Dorman Axle Shaft  Rear Right
  • ; Excludes Double Cab
  • Product Attributes:
    • ABS Tone Ring Installed: Not Included
    • Axle Type: Solid Shaft Axle
    • Hole Quantity: 6
    • Package Contents: Axle Shaft, Wheel Studs, Wheel Nuts, Bearing And Seal
    • Spline Quantity: 30
    • Wheel Lug Quantity: 6
Brand: Dorman
Position: Rear Right
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Body Position
2006 - Toyota Tundra Extended Cab Pickup Rear Right
Dorman
2001 Toyota 4Runner Axle Shaft - Rear Left Dorman

P311-50950E7    630-500  New

4231135400

Qty:
189.30
Dorman Axle Shaft  Rear Left
  • ; w/Vehicle Stability Control From 8/00 w/16 In. Wheels
  • Product Attributes:
    • ABS Tone Ring Installed: Not Included
    • Axle Type: Solid Shaft Axle
    • Hole Quantity: 7
    • Package Contents: Axle Shaft, Wheel Studs, Wheel Nuts, Bearing And Seal
    • Spline Quantity: 30
    • Wheel Lug Quantity: 6
Brand: Dorman
Position: Rear Left
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2001 - Toyota 4Runner Rear Left
Dorman
2001 Toyota 4Runner Axle Shaft - Rear Right Dorman

P311-50950E7    630-500  New

4231135400

Qty:
189.30
Dorman Axle Shaft  Rear Right
  • ; w/Vehicle Stability Control From 8/00 w/16 In. Wheels
  • Product Attributes:
    • ABS Tone Ring Installed: Not Included
    • Axle Type: Solid Shaft Axle
    • Hole Quantity: 7
    • Package Contents: Axle Shaft, Wheel Studs, Wheel Nuts, Bearing And Seal
    • Spline Quantity: 30
    • Wheel Lug Quantity: 6
Brand: Dorman
Position: Rear Right
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2001 - Toyota 4Runner Rear Right
Dorman
2002 Toyota 4Runner Axle Shaft - Rear Left Dorman

P311-50950E7    630-500  New

4231135400

Qty:
189.30
Dorman Axle Shaft  Rear Left
  • ; w/Vehicle Stability Control w/16 In. Wheels
  • Product Attributes:
    • ABS Tone Ring Installed: Not Included
    • Axle Type: Solid Shaft Axle
    • Hole Quantity: 7
    • Package Contents: Axle Shaft, Wheel Studs, Wheel Nuts, Bearing And Seal
    • Spline Quantity: 30
    • Wheel Lug Quantity: 6
Brand: Dorman
Position: Rear Left
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2002 - Toyota 4Runner Rear Left
Dorman
2002 Toyota 4Runner Axle Shaft - Rear Right Dorman

P311-50950E7    630-500  New

4231135400

Qty:
189.30
Dorman Axle Shaft  Rear Right
  • ; w/Vehicle Stability Control w/16 In. Wheels
  • Product Attributes:
    • ABS Tone Ring Installed: Not Included
    • Axle Type: Solid Shaft Axle
    • Hole Quantity: 7
    • Package Contents: Axle Shaft, Wheel Studs, Wheel Nuts, Bearing And Seal
    • Spline Quantity: 30
    • Wheel Lug Quantity: 6
Brand: Dorman
Position: Rear Right
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2002 - Toyota 4Runner Rear Right
Genuine
2002 Toyota 4Runner Axle Shaft Genuine

P311-544A828    W0133-2155246  New

Qty:
758.59
Genuine Axle Shaft
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
2002 - Toyota 4Runner SR5
Genuine
1997 Toyota Tacoma Axle Shaft Genuine

P311-544A828    W0133-2155246  New

Qty:
758.59
Genuine Axle Shaft
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; with ABS
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1997 - Toyota Tacoma
Genuine
2008 Toyota FJ Cruiser Axle Shaft Genuine

P311-359B7E2    W0133-2274479  New

Qty:
700.56
Genuine Axle Shaft
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2008 - Toyota FJ Cruiser
Genuine
2009 Toyota FJ Cruiser Axle Shaft Genuine

P311-359B7E2    W0133-2274479  New

Qty:
700.56
Genuine Axle Shaft
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: -07/31/2009
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2009 - Toyota FJ Cruiser To:07-31-09

Latest Car Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

2003 Toyota Tundra Dangerous Braking Issue

Showing 2 out of 9 Posts | Show 7 Hidden Posts
Question From weisbeck20 on 2003 Toyota Tundra Dangerous Braking Issue

2003 toyota tundra 3.4L 4x4 140k miles

I'll be honest, I thought I was going to die on the way home today.

My brakes pulsate extremely hard when coming to a stop, although they do it when braking at all speeds. There is also a very distinguished *CLUNK* which is more noticeable when braking at low speeds and is in rhythm with the speed of the vehicle (about once every rotation or so). When I am traveling at low speeds (25mph) with my head out the window it sounds as if the noise is from the rear wheel of the truck, although I cant be entirely sure. Slight grinding noise also heard at those speeds when coasting or accelerating.

I have drum brakes in the rear. I jacked up the rear, removed the tire and drum housing and there are no gouges or divets in the smooth surface of the drum and the pads are evenly worn and still thick enough to be plenty effective.

This truck is my only mode of transportation and I am scared to death to drive it. I swear it felt like I wasnt going to be able to stop every time I hit a red light.

My other thought is possibly a bad wheel bearing. I am relatively mechanically inclined but I have never fooled with drum brakes before.

Ideas? Help?
Thanks in advance!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Don't drive it anymore! If you can't ascertain if a drum brake is even in order stop there and get help. Why do you think it's the rear at all?


Just because linings seem to have enough material left disc or drum means nothing really as you are hearing a clunk and could be tons of assorted things including a brake pad (front) that come off the backing plate but looks fine until you take it apart.


No offense but I don't think this should be driven and if a problem with drum brakes or any you really should get help from what you said,


T

Response From weisbeck20

P.S. sorry about the double post, Tom. I wasn't sure which forum was more appropriate.

Cheers

Response From Tom Greenleaf

All is cool just dual post confuses everything.


If you think all "clunk" and problems are rear and not showing being worn or seeing anything obvious it very well could be something else that effects brakes. Bearings, backing plate, broken springs, wheel cylinder, flex hose, of a few and most rear drum brakes would also use the service brake for the parking brake and that comes in to play big time. Any frozen cable or broken part of that would alter feel and behavior of rear brakes. (Note: A few vehicles use fronts for parking brake but doubt a disc/drum truck)


I understand that a drum brake looks complicated but it's just a lot of springs but they do have to be intact and in the correct places. Hardest part can be adjusting all new work especially if parking brake parts were involved but is crude as can be when you really look at things vs some unseen magic going on that you don't.


If applicable a problem with drum brakes in certain conditions is they can't release dirt/dust or even the dust from wear over time and that can make them drag or get hot and shake but you should see one side is different than the other if heat is causing a problem OR any if one side is worn differently than the other.


Not so common is maybe whole rear end can move because of a bushing on some strut and pulling on parking brake? IDK?


I know it's your transportation but clearly this has to be fixed. As they say "going is optional" and "stopping is going to happen but not good if not where and when you wanted" type thing,


Tom

Response From weisbeck20

Not sure how to post a video to the thread from my phone, but i am able to grab the lugs at 12 and 6 oclock and move the hub up and down slightly. Dont think this should happen. Does that narrow down my options?

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Ya - a pic is a 1,000 words but I can type if you can read. Should be what I'll call an axle rear end meaning one solid housing with a "pumkin" full of gears in the middle - the differential.


OK - Now hoist with wheel on and tightened and support the vehicle properly and safely. Start with room to pry up on tire and listen or feel/observe motion it shouldn't have. Rock whole wheel + tire top and bottom (12+6 position) and again at 9+3 by the clock if you will.


If you can't feel anything you might need a helper to do this while you look at parts that really shouldn't move by hand at all.


Don't know all layouts but should be either "leaf" spring rear end or coils (not so sure of that on this) and know that coil sprung requires struts to keep rear axle in place both front and rear motion and side to side. There are bushings all over on that type and if leaf spring set up the primary bushing is on the front mount of a leaf spring -- rear should swing but not by hand and has mounts as well holding it from left to right motion but not pushing or pulling the frame for power or braking right there.


General with leaf springs is "U" bolts holding spring to axle housing. Look that they are in place and tight and NO broken leafs in any springs.


Sorry I don't know the layout and with my luck if I guess it would be the other.


If a bearing issue you need to know exactly what type is used. Hub bearings are more for independent suspended wheels and much more likely if a "live" (my word for common axle types) is bearing is in housing of axle using a race or the axle shaft as the race. Dang - there are many ways to do the same thing. I'll look it up if I can and see what types might have been used on this and may matter what the truck's weight capacity is as to what type.


In short you need to know what can and should move if pried on and what shouldn't.


I'm here when I can be but are you apt to do this yourself if you do find something clearly wrong? Takes some tools and equipment no matter what and some is rentable for free (full deposit) at places like the large parts outlets similar to Autozone for example. You still need specific details for some things and some know how or an experienced helper all depending on what you might find.


Know where to hoist and know where to place jack stands and be on solid surface that is level! Jack that comes with the vehicle no doubt suks and remember you NEVER get under a vehicle with a jack only supporting it so you must know where to place stands elsewhere.


Need to know what you are capable of and equipment/tools available too if you do find something out of order and there is with your complaint but knowing what could be tricky - don't know yet so do what you can to find out or send it out,


Tom

Response From Hammer Time

I really don't think you should be overlooking the front so much, especially since you did work there recently. You could have a loose caliper that would be very dangerous. Brake pulsation rarely comes from drum brakes. You talk about looseness in a wheel hub but never mention which one.

Response From weisbeck20

New development. Truck rear jacked up, transmission in drive, clunking and grinding heard from rear driver tire with the wheel and drum housing off. Click heard when brakes applied. ABS light came on. Thoughts?

Response From weisbeck20

I don't plan on driving it until I fix the issue, of course. It sounds like its coming from the rear. That is why I believe it is the rear. I replaced both front all front pads and both rotors not 2 months ago.

No offense taken, I am getting help from the astute minds on this forum. If no one here offers me a logical conclusion then of course I will take the vehicle to a shop. But if I can save myself a few hundred dollars and fix the problem myself then I will certainly try.