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Showing 1 - 10 of 6,506 Products.

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Hengst
2014 Audi A8 Quattro Engine Oil Filter Kit Hengst - with O-Ring

P311-4331795    W0133-2039214  New

Qty:
$38.46
Hengst Engine Oil Filter Kit
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Insert
  • Includes O-Ring
  • with O-Ring
Brand: Hengst
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Aspiration
2014 - Audi A8 Quattro Supercharged
Textar
2003 Audi A8 Quattro Disc Brake Pad Set Textar - with Shims

P311-2612136    W0133-1821052  New

Qty:
$31.25
Textar Disc Brake Pad Set
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • OE Replacement
  • with Shims
Brand: Textar
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2003 - Audi A8 Quattro
Textar
2000 Audi A8 Quattro Disc Brake Pad Set Textar - with Shims

P311-2612136    W0133-1821052  New

Qty:
$31.25
Textar Disc Brake Pad Set
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • OE Replacement
  • Chas: 005001-
  • with Shims
Brand: Textar
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Chassis Range
2000 - Audi A8 Quattro 005001 and up
ATE
2003 Audi A8 Quattro Disc Brake Pad Set ATE - with Shims

P311-0E11568    W0133-1821052  New

Qty:
$48.86
ATE Disc Brake Pad Set
  • Original OE Formulated
  • with Shims
Brand: ATE
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2003 - Audi A8 Quattro
ATE
2000 Audi A8 Quattro Disc Brake Pad Set ATE - with Shims

P311-0E11568    W0133-1821052  New

Qty:
$48.86
ATE Disc Brake Pad Set
  • Original OE Formulated
  • Chas: 005001-
  • with Shims
Brand: ATE
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Chassis Range
2000 - Audi A8 Quattro 005001 and up
HJS
2006 Audi A8 Quattro Exhaust Clamp 8 Cyl 4.2L HJS

P311-25F982D    W0133-1843621  New

Qty:
$27.58
HJS Exhaust Clamp
  • Dual Clip Type - 60x95mm
  • Dual Clip Type 60x95mm
Brand: HJS
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2006 - Audi A8 Quattro V 8 Cyl 4.2L - 4172
HJS
2017 Audi A8 Quattro Exhaust Clamp HJS

P311-25F982D    W0133-1843621  New

Qty:
$27.58
HJS Exhaust Clamp
  • Dual Clip Type 60x95mm
Brand: HJS
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2017 - Audi A8 Quattro
Husky Liners
1999 Audi A8 Floor Mat Set - Rear Husky Liners - Heavy Duty Floor Mat

P311-08F4DF7    52021  New

Qty:
$57.95
Husky Liners Floor Mat Set  Rear
  • 2nd Or 3rd Seat Floor Mats
  • Black; 2 pc.; Does Not Cover Hump
  • Heavy Duty Floor Mat
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Black
    • Material: Rubber
    • Position: Rear
    • Style: Molded
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65: Yes
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65 Message: Cancer And Reproductive
  • Available for virtually all of today's top selling vehicles, Husky Liners(R) Heavy Duty Floor Mats are made ultra tough to take whatever abuse you throw at them. Other mats have met their match.
Brand: Husky Liners
Position: Rear
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
1999 - Audi A8 Rear
Husky Liners
1998 Audi A8 Floor Mat Set - Front Husky Liners - Heavy Duty Floor Mat

P311-1EDF2DC    51113  New

Qty:
$70.95
Husky Liners Floor Mat Set  Front
  • Front Floor Mats
  • Tan; 2 pc.; Front
  • Heavy Duty Floor Mat
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Tan
    • Material: Rubber
    • Position: Front
    • Style: Molded
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65: Yes
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65 Message: Cancer And Reproductive
  • Available for virtually all of today's top selling vehicles, Husky Liners(R) Heavy Duty Floor Mats are made ultra tough to take whatever abuse you throw at them. Other mats have met their match.
Brand: Husky Liners
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
1998 - Audi A8 Front
Husky Liners
1998 Audi A8 Floor Mat Set - Front Husky Liners - Heavy Duty Floor Mat

P311-112A821    51111  New

Qty:
$70.95
Husky Liners Floor Mat Set  Front
  • Front Floor Mats
  • Black; 2 pc.; Front
  • Heavy Duty Floor Mat
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Black
    • Material: Rubber
    • Position: Front
    • Style: Molded
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65: Yes
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65 Message: Cancer And Reproductive
  • Available for virtually all of today's top selling vehicles, Husky Liners(R) Heavy Duty Floor Mats are made ultra tough to take whatever abuse you throw at them. Other mats have met their match.
Brand: Husky Liners
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
1998 - Audi A8 Front

Showing 1 - 10 of 6,506 Products.


Latest Audi A8 Repair Guides & Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Problem with Audi A8

Showing 6 out of 6 Posts
Question From Eka1921 on Problem with Audi A8

Year of vehicle 2000
Make of vehicle (Ford/ Chevrolet) Audi A8
Model of vehicle ( Taurus/ Cavalier)
Engine size (2.0/ 5.7) 3.3
Mileage/Kilometers 240 000

When i'm driwing and give him more power he just turn of,i am Mechanic and i don't know what is the problem please help

Response From Hammer Time

This AC can be shutting down for any assortment of reasons.

The first thing that needs to be done is a complete evacuate and recharge to get the proper amount of refrigerant into the system as certain pressures can be shutting the system down from either high or low extremes at higher RPM.

From there you can find out if there are any other issues while monitoring the pressures. You would also need a scan tool to examine the return signals from pressure sensors for accuracy.

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

OK - Is that miles or KMs? Really doesn't matter and I personally don't have any specifics on these cars.
It's known to me as a performance vehicle which also means it likely has a WOT (= Wide Open Throttle) cut out for the compressor for maximum available power for the most power when requested.
About all I know of are using info or the intake manifold vacuum directly or converted to electrical to tell the compressor to shut down.
When asking for WOT manifold vacuum is close to zero so a vacuum leak in the wrong place would send along wrong info and is what I'd look for first,


T

Response From Eka1921

Kilometers

Response From Tom Greenleaf

That helps. Same suggestion. Look for hoses and items on intake manifold that either directly or with a rubber hose(?) are in fact in good shape. Items may just plug in so connection(s) must be good.
It's just the first thing to at least rule out. If you find vacuum items in tough shape, brittle, cracks, or bloated from oil or anything wrong replace them pro-actively anyway as those things don't last forever,


T

Response From Eka1921


1999 Audi A8 engine dies

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From franknl on 1999 Audi A8 engine dies

I have an Audi A8 '99 and when it's over 86 degrees outside and the revs drop under 1000 the engine drops away 'sometimes'. I notice it happens more often when a) the gas is almost empty b) the car has been turned on, off for a bit but not enough to coolo off and on again in the same ride.
The Audi dealer replaced two sensors which 'always are the issue when this happens', but that didn't work at all.

Anyone knows what this is or what to do? I'm getting quite desperate.

Edit: It's a V8 4.2l, 150.000 miles on it.

Response From Sidom Top Rated Answer

There is not really a whole lot of info to go off of here.. You mentioned "drops under 1000 rpm" I would have to check the exact specs but idling over 1000 rpm for any car is a bit high for normal conditions and this could be part of the problem.....

I would make sure there isn't any vacuum leaks or false air getting past the MAF sensor (air intake hose off or broken). It's possible you have had a vacuum leak that is now getting worse and that would make a car die @ idle, it can also make an engine idle high but it should be setting a code.

Are you getting any P0171 or P0174 codes?

2002 VW Beetle intermittent cooling

Showing 2 out of 16 Posts | Show 14 Hidden Posts
Question From comnavguy on 2002 VW Beetle intermittent cooling

2002 Beetle with 2.0L engine and 127,000 miles just started blowing cold intermittently. I suspect one of the pressure switches but I can not locate the low line pressure switch.

Can you give me the location of the low pressure switch and the wiring diagram of the low and high switches? I've traced the return line from the firewall back to the compressor and can not see a pressure switch anywhere on that line. Is it possible it's built into the compressor?

Response From Hammer Time

That's because it doesn't have one.

















Response From comnavguy

Thanks for the info and schematics. I'll go and put my pea brain to work to see if I can solve the problem.

I evacuated the system and it held for over an hour. I tried recharging. I got about 75 PSI on high and low side but the clutch would not engage. I jumpered the clutch and it engaged. The pressure on the high gauge started climbing but as soon as I disconnected the jumper, the clutch disengaged. The fuse is good. I have not yet gone under the dash to check the relay(s).

Am I right that the problem is most likely the high pressure switch or the relay?

Can you tell me the approximate resistance between pins 1, 2 and 3 on the high pressure switch? I measured 4K between 1,2; 1,3; and 2,3 with the switch off the system.

Response From Hammer Time

These are not fun cars to work on and you may regret getting involved.. That switch is only one of 20 or more things that can cause the compressor to cut out up to and including the PCM. That switch will cut out for both high and low pressures. Resistance is not the way to test it. You have to look for continuity in the circuit.

Response From comnavguy

You are more than right about the absence of fun. The fuse legends/icons are a puzzle by themselves, and why any designer would hide the relay panel is beyond reason. I'm going to see if I can swap a couple of relays and if that doesn't work, I'll spring $24 for the high pressure switch; but I hate just throwing parts at a problem. And giving up is not in my nature.

Response From Hammer Time

Yeah, I wouldn't recommend the dartboard method.

Response From comnavguy

We did replace the high pressure switch. Nothing.

So, do you know which relay under the dash is the AC relay?

Response From Hammer Time

I told you that you'd be sorry.


Compressor Clutch Engagement

On Golf/Jetta and new Beetles, current to the A/C Compressor Clutch -N25- is supplied by the Coolant Fan Control Module -J293-. This module is switched by the A/C switch -E35- on the manual A/C systems. On Passat models, the current to the A/C compressor clutch is supplied by the A/C Control Module -J314-. Inputs from pressure switches, temperature sensors and other control modules are processed by Coolant Fan Control Module -J293- to determine the compressor on/off state.

Response From comnavguy

Sorry is not even half the story. The cost and frustration is beyond imagination.

I really appreciate your giving me this latest information. It is good that we have the manual system. I just found that the ambient temp sensor is bad. Ambient is stuck at 69 whether I heat it with a heat gun or cool it with component cooler spray.

I'll replace that sensor Monday. If you see blood coming out my eyes Monday evening...

Response From Hammer Time

I seriously doubt that is preventing the compressor from engaging.

Response From Discretesignals

I don't see any diagnostic test results, just a bunch of guessing and changing parts.

Response From comnavguy

We are not just guessing and throwing parts at the problem. As best as we can without a shop manual, we are tracing wires, testing for shorts or opens or corroded grounds or the 30 AMP fuse on the top of the battery that seems to be intermittent (*) on MANY VWs and Audis. As a DIYer I don't think I'm too far wrong when I say this Rube Goldberg AC design on those cars is a bad joke.

Not that it's any consolation, but when I go to two different AC specialty shops and they roll their eyes and say, "Dealer" when I tell them the year, make and model of the car, I feel less inept.

When HT (a superman in my estimation) tells me that I'll be sorry I took on this job, I feel less inept.

But all that being said, all we've done so far it to eliminate two possible components causing this failure. I'm still looking for help and suggestions as to the other specific parts we could check/diagnose to get the AC working.

How about you? Do you know of any relays, specifically under the dash that are in the AC system? Say for instance relay 175 or any others by the steering column? Do you have any suggestion(s) other than "dealer"? I need help.

* Yes, I've worked on some of the most cutting edge electronics on the B47, B52, KC97G an KC135 and AF planes and I've never seen an intermittent fuse. This one is not really intermittent, but the fuse holder blades get corroded and don't make good contact causing AC to work intermittently. So just looking at the fuse in the normal way shows that it's good)

Response From Hammer Time

As I already posted, the compressor doesn't use a relay. It's operated by the cooling fan control module.

Response From comnavguy

I'm not being obstinate just for the exercise. I was told by several "experts" that there was another relay under the dash. There IS a relay under the dash but it operates the glove box on a Studebaker next door.

The car was taken to a VW dealer to specifically diagnose the A/C. Cost $122, and they came back with a laundry list of things that "needed" to be done BEFORE they could diagnose the A/C - including replacing the Alternator wiring harness and the fuse box. After that needless work was done, they said the high pressure switch was bad.

I replaced that switch twice. Did I get 2 switches bad out of the box???

The dealer wanted $465 to replace that switch and recharge the system. The customer declined, and I don't blame her.

I disassembled one of the "bad" switches, and it's easy to see how one could get two bad out of the box. Rube Goldberg would give VW the Decade's top award. What a lousy over designed AC mess.

We replaced the switch for the 3rd time, and the system is working but still goes warm occasionally.

Response From Hammer Time

See, now you also will run the next time you see a VW bug with no AC.

Response From comnavguy Top Rated Answer

I'm way past the age of running - three heart stents, anemia and other health issues, so walking briskly is an accomplishment, but I'll get on my scooter and burn rubber leaving the scene. It won't just be from Beetles either.

It was a learning experience, to say the least.

However, when I hit the Powerball tonight, I'll still buy an Audi A8 and maybe even an R8. $400 K is pocket change when you just won $200 million?

Now back to reality...

2005 Audi A8L 4.2 AC issues - watery sound, lack of cool air

Showing 3 out of 3 Posts
Question From bugbehr on 2005 Audi A8L 4.2 AC issues - watery sound, lack of cool air

Year: 2005
Make: Audi
Model: A8L
Engine size: 4.2L
Mileage: 75,500 miles

Hello! I had just gotten the timing belt and water pump replaced by an indie shop two days ago, in preparation for a cross-country drive back to CA from NY. Around 4PM today, the air coming out of the vents began to feel significantly less cool. Eventually, (to quote Jeremy Clarkson) the air like an asthmatic wheezing through a straw. I noticed water (or a substance similar to water) dripping down onto the front of the passenger side footwell, and I noticed a sound like burbling water, sounding kind of like a small water fountain, coming from the air vents. In addition, there was a bit of condensation on the plastic slats on the air vents.

Is my AC failing because of the humidity and heat, in addition to running at 60+ mph for over 10 hours each day? Or is this a more serious issue linked to my cooling system? I still have 1,600 miles to go before arriving back at home, and I'll have to cross Texas and Arizona in the summer heat. Should I delay my trip and get this issue fixed ASAP?

PS - I found the following post on another forum, and was wondering if it was also relevant to my issue:

"This is a shot in the dark, but I might know what's up. First, I have never heard of an air bubble in the coolant system making a noise you can actually hear. I'm wondering if the noise you are hearing is water trapped in the heater vent system. When the A/C runs to cool the air, any moisture in the air will condense on the cooling fins. This moisture collects and drains out of the heater box through a little tube. With like 99% of car this tube goes back trough the firewall and just drips on the ground near the back of the engine compartment. If something blocks or freezes in this drain tube, you could have a lot of water trapped in the heater box. I don't know where "Bloomington" is but if it has been cold maybe water froze in the drain tube. A leaf getting into the wrong place could also stop it up. It's happened to me with other cars."


PSS - I also found a post on a FIAT forum from someone who heard water gurgling from behind their dashboard. Not long afterwards, their headgasket blew. Will the same thing happen to me if I don't get this fixed?

link deleted............not allowed

Response From Hammer Time

Sounds to me like you simply have a plugged up condensation drain. You will have to locate the drain on the engine side of the firewall and blow it out with compressed air.

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

bugbehr: The reason if just water is just as HT said. If just water it would dry out on a paper towel, antifreeze wont. Hope not that! You are underway now apparently now and yes headed for likely hot weather as you said. Short of tools if you can find the drain on firewall at least see if it's intact.

Why did you check a FIAT forum for an Audi? The most common reason for head gasket failures is overheating IMO not inoperative A/C but since you just had a water pump done and may be late, check coolant level as if low after the work done could be the most important problem now. No engine no A/C anyway and worse - walking or towed to next place for more possible repairs.

Suggestion: If doing preventative work prior to a trip of the sort that long especially best to do ahead when at all possible so it proves itself fixed as breaking down on a long run from known places is a nightmare. Good luck with the run.

If you must this (condensate drain) ((Water)) could probably be solved at some truck stops places quickly unless in some very difficult location could be a while you wait fix,

T